< 2021 Capstone Gallery

Under Local Waves: Promotional Posters

A series of animated promotional posters that serve as outreach materials for the five Oregon Marine Reserves, portraying several local environments that the Reserves study and some of the biodiversity of the wildlife that lives inside them. Overseen by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, these Marine Reserve sites are located at Cape Falcon, Otter Rock, Redfish Rocks, Cascade Head, and Cape Perpetua. The central purpose of theposter series is to clearly and strongly communicate to the public about the Reserves’ conservation mission and encourage them to learn more.


Estuary Poster

Estuaries

An estuary is a body of water with an accompanying wetlands (and/or mud flats) where the mouth of a river flows out to join the ocean. Estuaries act as fertile nurseries for more than one species and introduce an influx of freshwater input and animals (such as the multiple types of salmon swimming from their in-land spawning grounds into the ocean) into the marine ecosystem.

The Salmon River estuary that feeds into the Cascade Head Reserve is an example of this environment.

An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living on a sandy beach. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Douglas fir tree, common raccoon, douglas’ squirrel, western sandpiper, semipalmated plower, sanderling, razor clam.” Up in the upper right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the bottom of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the environments protected by the Reserves are the beaches.  Beaches are a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com.

Sandy Beaches

A beach is a body of sand and rocks located beside an ocean, often acted upon by the impact of the waves and winds. Driftwood and seaweed are a constant presence on beaches. They are usually quite popular as recreational places to visit or explore by members of the public.

Razor clams burrow into wet sand when the tide goes out, shorebirds hunt for a meal, and squirrels skitter up the trees. The Short Sand Beach in the Cape Falcon Reserve is an example of this ecosystem.

An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living on a rocky beach. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Black oystercatcher, common murre, Leach’s storm petrel, rockweed, harbor seal, hairy hermit crab, keyhole limpet, acorn barnacles, black turban snail.” Down in the lower right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the top of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the natural environments protected by the Reserves are beaches. Beaches are a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com.”

Rocky Beaches

A beach is a body of sand and rocks located beside an ocean, often acted upon by the impact of the waves and winds. There are beaches on the west coast that are mostly rocks. Barnacles, algae, and rockweed cover boulders. They are often quite popular as places to visit or explore by members of the public.

Harbor seals lay in the sun, common murres soar in the sky overhead, and hermit crabs inch out of cracks between pebbles. The Otter Rock Reserve has rocky beaches on its site.

An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living in a tide pool. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Acorn barnacles, aggregating anemone, tide pool sculpin, giant green anemone, dungeness crab, ochre star, sunflower star, pacific mussels, red sea urchin, hermit crab, mossy chiton, pacific limpet.” Up in the lower right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the top of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the environments protected by the Reserves are offshore bottoms. They are a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com.”

Tide Pools

A tide pool is a section of the beach where the cycle of the tides leave pools of water in the rocks. The highest tides surge in and cover everything but the part in the splash zone. The lowest tides pull back to the low tide zones, permitting the rocks surrounding the tide pools to dry.

Barnacles cling to their perches and sculpins hide under rocks. Tide pools are popular but highly delicate ecosystems. The Otter Rock Reserve has tide pools on its site. Visitors should take the greatest care to not damage them and watch where they step while sight-seeing in these places.

An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living in the offshore bottoms. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Pacific herring, sea pen, sand sole, sand dollar, pacific sardine.” Up in the lower right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the top of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the environments protected by the Reserves are offshore reefs. Reefs are a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com.”

Offshore Bottoms

The offshore bottoms found underwater are flat areas shaped by the endless movement of the waves. Mud and sand form a soft, murky, and shifting seafloor where an entire community of marine creatures dwell.

Schools of pacific herrings and sardines swim about in the currents, flatfishes squirm down under the murk to hide from predators, and invertebrates filter-feed by extracting bits of nutrients from the water and the silty sand. The Cape Perpetua Reserve has offshore sandy bottoms on its site.

An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living on a rocky reef. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Ocean whitefish, tiger rockfish, giant green anemone, canary rockfish, black rockfish, sugar kelp, sharp-nosed crab, ochre star, aggregating anemone, bat star, striped perch.” Up in the lower right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the top of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the environments protected by the Reserves are offshore reefs. Reefs are a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com.”

Rocky Reefs

A rocky reef isn’t a coral reef like the colorful tropical reefs well-known in the mainstream awareness. A rocky reef are stony crags that are submerged underwater (with sections that can break through to the ocean’s surface) where marine wildlife finds shelter and seaweed and algae grow on the rocks.

Crabs scuttle, sea stars clump up on the rocks, and black rockfish hide in crevices. The Siletz Reef in the Cascade Head Reserve is an example of this ecosystem.

Kelpbed Poster

Kelp Beds

A kelp bed is self-explanatory in that it’s a thick mass of bull kelp floating in the ocean, rootlike holdfasts anchored onto the rocks and seafloor below the surface. Animals dart through the branches of the kelp and feed off the leaves of the bull kelp.

Rockfish, lingcod, sablefish, and kelp greenling are just some of the numerous fish species that can be found living within this habitat. The Redfish Rocks Reserve has kelp beds on its site.


Animations

An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living on an estuary. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Copper rockfish, salal, Brandt’s cormorant, caper clam, great blue heron, chinook salmon, dungeness crab, longfin smelt, arrowgrass.” Up in the upper right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the bottom of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the environments protected by the Reserves are estuaries. An estuary is a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com.” The poster is animated so the animals blink sometimes and occasionally sunlight reflects off the water.
An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living on a sandy beach. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Douglas fir tree, common raccoon, douglas’ squirrel, western sandpiper, semipalmated plower, sanderling, razor clam.” Up in the upper right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the bottom of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the environments protected by the Reserves are the beaches.  Beaches are a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com. The poster is animated so the animals blink sometimes and occasionally sunlight reflects off the water.
An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living on a rocky beach. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Black oystercatcher, common murre, Leach’s storm petrel, rockweed, harbor seal, hairy hermit crab, keyhole limpet, acorn barnacles, black turban snail.” Down in the lower right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the top of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the natural environments protected by the Reserves are beaches. Beaches are a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com.” The poster is animated so the animals blink sometimes and occasionally sunlight reflects off the water.
An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living in a tide pool. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Acorn barnacles, aggregating anemone, tide pool sculpin, giant green anemone, dungeness crab, ochre star, sunflower star, pacific mussels, red sea urchin, hermit crab, mossy chiton, pacific limpet.” Up in the lower right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the top of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the natural environments protected by the Reserves are tide pools. Tide pools are a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com.” The poster is animated so the animals blink sometimes and occasionally sunlight reflects off the water.
An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living in the offshore bottoms. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Pacific herring, sea pen, sand sole, sand dollar, pacific sardine.” Up in the lower right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the top of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the environments protected by the Reserves are offshore bottoms. They are a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com.” The poster is animated so the animals blink sometimes and occasionally bursts of bubbles float upwards.
An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living on a rocky reef. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Ocean whitefish, tiger rockfish, giant green anemone, canary rockfish, black rockfish, sugar kelp, sharp-nosed crab, ochre star, aggregating anemone, bat star, striped perch.” Up in the lower right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the top of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the environments protected by the Reserves are offshore reefs. Reefs are a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com.” The poster is animated so the animals blink sometimes and occasionally bursts of bubbles float upwards.
An illustrated poster, depicting a number of plants and animals living in a kelp bed. All of the animals and plants are labelled. The labels read: “Yellowtail rockfish, lingcod, blue rockfish, kelp greenling, bull kelp, kelp bass, sablefish.” Up in the lower right corner is the logo of the Oregon Marine Reserves. On the top of the poster is text. It reads: “Oregon Marine Reserves: The more we learn about our coastal waters, the better we can sustain them for future generations. That’s why the five Marine Reserves in Oregon are dedicated to scientific research, exploration, and conservation. One of the environments protected by the Reserves are kelp beds. Kelp beds are a habitat vital to the survival of many native plants and wildlife. Learn more about our mission @oregonmarinereserves.com.” The poster is animated so the animals blink sometimes and occasionally bursts of bubbles float upwards.

Watch For A Minute Or So

The animations for the posters are looped.

Summer Bogard

Summer Bogard

In addition to being a graphic designer with a strong focus on illustration, I’m a local Oregonian and some of my personal interests include reading, listening to pop music, and nature. I also love hiking and writing for fun.

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